Online fandom communities as networked counterpublics: LGBTQ+ youths’ perceptions of representation and community climate

Online fandom communities as networked counterpublics: LGBTQ+ youths’ perceptions of representation and community climate

Description
New publication in Convergence: The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies
Categories
Publications
Slug
Featured
Featured
Ready to Publish
Ready to Publish
Author
Oliver W. J. Beer
Publish on
Jul 25, 2021
Status
Hide Page Cover
Hide Page Cover
Hide Date
Hide Date
Canonical
Duration
2 min. read
Related Posts

Online fandom communities as networked counterpublics: LGBTQ+ youths’ perceptions of representation and community climate

McInroy, L. B., Zapcic, I., & Beer, O. W. J.

Abstract

Online fandom communities (OFCs) provide lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and other sexual and/or gender minority (LGBTQ+) youth opportunities to access community-generated LGBTQ+ representations—contrasting mass media’s continued deficiencies in depiction of LGBTQ+ people and communities. This study sought to better understand LGBTQ+ adolescents’ and young adults’ (age 14–29) perceptions of OFCs regarding LGBTQ+ representation and community climate. Qualitative content analysis was employed to analyze open-ended survey questions from respondents in the United States and Canada (n = 3665). Three primary themes emerged: (1) LGBTQ+ mass media narratives remained insufficient but were improving; (2) counternarratives produced within OFCs were even better; however, (3) the climate of OFCs created challenges and limitations, including to the quantity and quality of depictions of diverse LGBTQ+ identities. Findings indicate OFCs may take on simultaneous qualities of networked publics and counterpublics, allowing youth opportunities to contest LGBTQ+ mass media depictions and problematic representations within OFCs.

Citation

McInroy, L. B., Zapcic, I., & Beer, O. W. J. (2021). Online fandom communities as networked counterpublics: LGBTQ+ youths’ perceptions of representation and community climate. Convergence: The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies. https://doi.org/10.1177/13548565211032377